Posterior Neck Pain Causes

Posterior neck pain is referred as pain occurred at the base of the skull. Neck pain typically causes stiff neck muscles or pain that moves down an arm or up into the head, and other symptoms are possible. Muscles may ache or feel rigid. Some people feel weakness in the shoulders and arms, or even a stabbing pain in the fingers due to posterior neck pain. Symptoms may only be of moderate nature, however, under certain circumstances, pain can get worse. It is reported by the American Chiropractic Association, ACA, that injury, spinal stenosis, improper posture, weak abdominal muscles, degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis, and obesity are the major causes of neck pain.

Posture

Abnormal posture of the head and neck can result in neck pain, which is the common cause of tension headaches. Headaches occur when the muscles in the neck compress some sensory and motor nerves. Gestures such as tilting the head forward and bending the back may exert a harmful influence on the neck muscles. It causes muscles in the front of the neck to become longer and those in the back become shorter. This causes muscles to get tight and exerts pressure on the occipital nerve. Any gesture such as raising the shoulder and leaning the head contracts and tightens the muscle that moves from your shoulder to your neck. So when you are looking at a monitor screen placed to the side or giving a call with a telephone between your neck and shoulder you neck may ache. But you can adjust your body posture by lying on your back and tucking your chin down and in. This extension will put muscles at the back of the neck at tension while strengthening the muscles in the front of the neck. Enhancing the strength of the abdominal area is a good option for neck pain resulting from rounded shoulders and a flexural spine. If the upper body, including the neck and head are not held by strong abdominal muscles, the muscles in the neck tighten. Obesity may also cause weakness of abdominal muscles, as the extra weight puts extra pressure on the back and neck resulting in pain.

Arthritis

Both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the neck can lead to neck pain. The joints in the neck are susceptible to wear and tear during the aging process of people. In this case, people may feel neck rigidity, headaches, pain that moves into the arms, and muscle spasms in the neck. Rheumatoid arthritis can be relieved by rest and medication, which help to alleviate inflammation and pain. What’s more, physical therapy can be used to treat cervical spondylosis, or osteoarthritis of the neck. It may include heating, icing, stretching and strengthening exercises as well as correcting pose. Besides, pain-killing medications such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are also very effective. Pain in the neck or back also give a signal that you develop spinal stenosis, a curved or narrowed spine often resulting from arthritis or other degenerative conditions deforming the spine.

Injury

Neck pain is often attributed to injury from a motor vehicle accident. Most people restore their health with time elapsing, but some individuals have been suffering from chronic neck pain ever since. In the case of whiplash, the head swerves to one direction, and then turns to the opposite direction as a result of great pull. The neck has to exceed its normal range of motion resulting in a neck sprain. This usually occurs when people are hit from behind by a vehicle. Common symptoms of whiplash includes: rigidity in the neck and the back of the head. Many people develop headaches as well. Pain occurs for nerves, muscles in the neck, discs, and ligaments are injured. Most people make a full recovery from whiplash; however, if muscles in the back of the neck are sprained, they may need a few months to obtain a comprehensive recovery.